THE CASE OF THE MYSTERIOUS ROYAL TOE

When I was about eight, I pointed to the second toe on my right foot and asked: “Why is this toe so much longer than my “big” toe?’

“That toe’s longer because you have royal blood,” my Mom said. “It’s called a Royal Toe.”

Wow! I’d hit the jack pot. Having a royal toe topped the whole kit and caboodle of childhood treasures: my collection of Bugs Bunny comics, my Tom Mix secret decoder ring and my box of mica and my striped rocks.

Over the years I didn’t think too much about the Royal Toe, though I savored the notion of my royal heritage when my friends Gail and Jane wouldn’t play with me.

When Bill and I first started dating, the subject of dental cavities came up. Being a survivor of many dental horrors—I averaged three or four new cavities every six months until I ran out of teeth—I was flummoxed when Bill said he’ had only three cavities in his whole life.

“Braggart,” I thought.

Then I one-upped him.

“Well, I have a Royal Toe,” I said.

“I’ve never heard of such a thing.”

“Well, it’s true.”

I didn’t volunteer to show him the toe, that day. The truth was that the top of that toe flared out like an exotic mushroom cap. And besides, I hadn’t changed my socks in a while.

So far our marriage has survived the exotic contours of the Royal Toe, but Bill never quite bought into the noble heritage story.

Over the past few months, the toe has become bothersome so I did a little sleuthing on the net and found some interesting facts about Royal Toes. Technically this toe abnormality is called Morton’s Toe, but I think Royal Toe has a better flair to it.

Stay tuned for the next breath taking, astonishing episode of the toe saga.

In the mean time, I want to hear from those of you who were born with a long second toe—or a Royal Toe.

How has it affected your life? Do you wear your Royal Toe proudly? Are you in therapy because of your toe?

Chime in!

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7 Responses to THE CASE OF THE MYSTERIOUS ROYAL TOE

  1. Royal Historian says:

    Please do not post or shar my email address without talking with me first.

    I am an historian of our ancient lineage of those with the "royal toe". I have doen extensive research including studying the genetics of this. It is not something we brag about, but yes, the toe doe descend from the most traceable line of ancient royalty known. I have a listing of about 200 surnames that have this descent. However, just because someone has that surname, DOES NOT mean they are of the lineage. Adoptions, mentorings, hostaging, etc. made for many persons having a lineage surname but not really being of the lineage "blood" descent. But having the toe appears to "clinch it" that one is of the lineage. Feel free to email me if you would like to know more. I would like to know your father's surname, as well as your mother's and as many of your grandmother's (both father's and mother's side.) as you would be willing to share. Depending on how far back you know your "papered genealogy", there is a chance I might be able to see which lines of royalty, you have gotten the trit from.

    Best regards

    R. David

  2. Royal Historian says:

    PS, many of us can be dyslexic at times as well ;)

  3. Carolann22 says:

    I too have the "royal toe." Our family had always said we were of royal heritage, and with the help of ancestry.com, I was able to trace that part of my tree to the Plantagenet family of England.

  4. Phangureh says:

    Recently we got together with extended family from around the world. Everyone of blood relations have the longer second toe. Not a single blood member was missing it. I decided to google it and ended up here!

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